Calvin McPhail-Snyder

Email: [username]@math.berkeley.edu. [username] = cmcs.
Office: 1044 Evans
Office Hours: M 2-3, W 12-1, or by appointment.

About

I am a third-year PhD student in the Mathematics Department at UC Berkeley. I graduated from the University of Virginia in 2015, and I passed my qualifying exam in August 2017.

Research

I am broadly interested in topology, mathematical physics, and representation theory. Another overly-broad descriptor is "quantum topology." Some more specific topics are: knot invariants, tensor categories and/or (braided) monoidal categories, quantum groups, diagram algebras, topological quantum field theory.

In Fal 2017 I am helping to organize the GRASP student seminar.

Teaching

Fall 2015
Math 10A (Methods of Mathematics: Calculus, Statistics and Combinatorics)
Spring 2016
Math 53 (Multivariable Calculus)
You can see the course webpage here, including some old quizzes.
Summer 2016
Math 53
I was the lead instructor for this course.
Fall 2016
Math 53
Spring 2017
Math 53
Summer 2017
Math W53 (Online Multivariable Calculus)
Fall 2017
Math 55 (Discrete Mathematics)
Course website

Are you a student who wants to do better on mathematics exams? If so, you may find this advice useful.

As an instructor, I am typically responsible for computing and entering final letter grades. After spending too much of my time wrangling with Excel spreadsheets at the end of the semester, I decided to write some Python to automate it for me. If you'd like to look at it or use it yourself, the code is hosted on GitHub. Comments are appreciated!

Writing

What is Lie algebra cohomology and why should you care? In the literature, there are two approaches to proving things like Levi decomposition and complete reducibility: detailed proofs without much intuition, or a mention of cohomology and a citation of a book on homological algebra. This document is an attempt at an intermediate approach.

Personal

I was a member of the Jefferson Literary and Debating Society while a student at UVA. Nowadays my non-mathematical pursuits are mostly restricted to playing mildly competitive ultimate (frisbee.)